Providence and Prayer in 1 1/4 pages

I will admit, I am sitting here stumped, yet quite tickled at God. I was researching prayer for an upcoming Christian Nursing 101 article and pulled out my handy-dandy Christian Theology textbook. Why I have a Christian Theology and a Systematic Theology textbooks is a topic for another discussion–LOL.

Anyway, I looked up in the index and find one entry on prayer entitled: Prayer and Providence found on pages 405-406. The one entry and number of pages are clues.  So I turn to the pages and find 1 1/4 page discussion. Tucked away, almost a side notification is prayer. I will admit, I turned to the table of contents and look for the word prayer. Finding nothing, I return to the index and decide, in my ineptness to look up intercessory. Nope, still nothing more on prayer. This is it. One small section, a 1 1/4 page discussion on prayer.

Providence PrayerPart Four: What God Does

Chapter 18: God’s Continuing Work: Providence

-Providence and Prayer

This small section is powerful and quite informative for me and my writing project:

“It [Prayer] is not a method of creating a positive mental attitude in ourselves so that we are able to do what we have asked to have done. Rather, prayer is in large part a matter of creating in ourselves a right attitude with respect to God’s will.” The short discussion continues with Jesus’ teaching found in the Lord’s Prayer, “Prayer is not so much getting God to do our will as it is demonstrating that we are as concerned as is God that his will be done.”

My insight for the day in regards to this discovery is God has provided a means for us to join Him in his plan for our world; and he welcomes us to communicate with him continuously. Even though, at times we make prayer complicated, keep in mind the basics of the Lord’s Prayer taught by Jesus. Through these simple, yet profound words, we can never go astray and loose that priceless connection with the God of the Universe.




Christian Nursing 101: Forgiveness in the Workplace?

Like many workers in health care or all workers experience conflict and even incivility in the workplace. And even if it isn’t as extreme as incivility or lateral violence, we experience angry colleagues, disgruntled employees, and/or emotional outburst; and probably like myself, have demonstrated non-Christlike behavior. It is tough to maintain any resemblance to Jesus’ love and grace amidst the high-stress and continuing demands of health care and academics. As I reflected on these challenges, I knew the beginning point was forgiveness. Not just, the churchy version of forgiveness, but the forgiveness described and lived out by our Savior.

I encourage you to read the article in the Journal of Christian Nursing, reflecting on your own workplace and situations. Included in the article is a link Dr. Luskin, the Director of the Stanford Forgiveness Project found at Learning to Forgive

JCN cover

Our workplace, like our home, is a training field for the testing of our faith and learning to live Christ-like.

Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing (James 1:2-4; NASB).




Christian Nursing 101: Human Personhood & Dignity

When I was asked to review the book, Lighting the Way: A Handbook for Christian Nurses and Midwives, I was excited to see how my Christian colleagues “across the pond” encouraged nurses and midwives. What you quickly discover is some of the health care issues we face in the States are similar to those of our colleagues around the world. Thus, I wasn’t surprised with an article on how society’s idea or worldview of humanity is rapidly changing. The chapter on personhood gave me a more alarming philosophy of the actual dehumanizing of mankind. Usually we see where scientist and creationist are tweeking with the DNA for a better human, almost like a special ordered human being. But, Wyatt’s article discusses selecting and deselecting some attributes that will no longer be classified as humans. An article like this and others, send me to my knees pleading with the Lord, “Please come quickly!” Do not let us become any more depraved and wicked, rejecting your ways and your laws (Romans 1).

I would love to hear from you!

Other links:

Check out the article in the Journal of Christian Nursing 

My review of the Lighting the Way


p.s. I am so thankful to Steve Fouch for the privelage of including my NCFI Cares devotions and contributing to this wonderful work.

Christian Nursing 101: Spiritual Reflection: Inviting God into Our Moments

During my presentation on Reflective Practice at the NCFI Congress last year, I shared how Christian nurses can invite the Holy Spirit into their reflective practice. This can simply done through a brief prayer, “Lord, help me talk with this patient about their cancer.” Or “Lord, how an I help this patient be more comfortable?” In some ways, these burst of prayers may be common place for many Christian nurses. On the other hand, a more deeper, purposeful level of prayer or reflection is found in contemplation.

In this issue of Journal of Christian Nursing, I share some quick hints on how to bring the quietness of the mind, the openness of the spirit, and the softness of the heart experienced during prayer into the moments, the minutes and the hours of our day.

Read the article and share how you bring the richness or communion with the Holy Spirit into your work day.

Christian Nursing 101: Nurses of Integrity

Integrity is an important value or attribute as a professional nurse and as a Christ follower. Yet, we may struggle to define integrity or put our finger on what a person with integrity says or does. Honesty, trustworthiness, moral uprightness are few words used by dictionaries. Even though we may struggle to describe a person with integrity, we definitely know it when we see it lacking in a person.  “So and so (speaking of individual) doesn’t act with integrity.”

I encourage you to read the article in Journal of Christian Nursing and let me know what you think. Also, I would enjoy seeing your comments on my definition:

 “Christian integrity is a heart or spiritual condition congruent with God’s character and statutes that is expressed by actions and attitudes forged through the continuous molding of the Holy Spirit through our daily times of devotion.”

How would you define Christian integrity?

Christian Nursing 101: Aging Gracefully

I will admit that I have many friends that are in their 60’s, thus the many questions related to “retirement” come up frequently. How many years left to work? Will you relocate? Downsize your house? etc,. At the same time, I have had the same conversations with my younger friends, who as busy working professionals trying to plan ahead.

Even before, I began searching the literature on aging for the column, I knew the concept of retirement looked differently for Christians. This became more obvious as I searched scripture and paid attention to the ages of the Biblical saints and their ministries. Their faithful service was until death. They provide us a new take on the phrase “until death do us part”.  We are in a lifetime, eternal relationship with God as his disciples committed to his calling. Nowhere in the Bible, nor in Christian history did the saints have a retirement party, nor use their golden years to fulfill personal “bucket lists”. They may have changed their roles, but the Lord continued to use them to provide wisdom and guidance to the future generation.

I would love to hear your thoughts and plans, and how the Lord has spoken to you about Aging Gracefully. 


Christian Nursing 101: Avoiding Ageism

We may readily admit that there is a “bias” or “negative attitude” towards older adults in our health care systems. This can be seen in assuming that a 90 year old should not have an organ transplant to putting adult diapers (depends) on a 70 year old. What may surprise you, is that ageism is in the Christian church!  One such example is the divide over types of worship music during Sunday service. One church’s solution was to have separate rooms for the worship–one room was the traditional hymns, while the other main service had the “christian rock” style of worship. I am sure it wasn’t intended, but the segregation of music brought ageism front and center to the body of Christ. There are and always will be the challenges of reaching the next generation for Christ, while embracing the wisdom and experience of our older brothers and sisters.

XLargeThumb.00005217-201607000-00000.CVAn important part of this balance is for nurses, who represent Christ to our profession and to the older adults in our church communities. Scripture is filled with examples of honor, respect, and dignity for seniors in the Kingdom.

Read the article in Journal of Christian Nursing and explore the various references used as citations.  We will not only avoid ageism, but we then can encourage and educate our fellow colleagues and parishioners in caring for senior saints across their entire lifespan!