NCFI Cares: Meditate on God’s Character

77ba6-ncficares_3bloglogoSo often we mull over, moan over the wrongs that people have done to us.  People like family members, church leaders, members, colleagues and bosses who misbehaved.  Choosing this habit of thinking will produce a toxic mind set which will only rob us of the joy, peace and righteousness in the Holy Spirit and of course, our health and life.

Just to encourage you on the journey of transformation by the renewal of the mind, read and meditate Psalm 36 which have 12 verses.  In my New King James Version of the Bible the title of this psalm reads “Man’s wickedness and God’s perfections”.  David, the psalmist, states that it is an oracle (which is a divine utterance delivered to man, usually in answer to a request for guidance) within his heart mentioning the transgression of the wicked in the first 4 verses which is 1/3 of the psalm.  However, he spent 2/3 of the psalm (verses 5-12) focusing on God’s character – His mercy, faithfulness, righteousness, judgments, loving kindness, provider, fountain of life and God’s action of protection at the end of the psalm.

We can choose to dwell on bad behaviours or wrongs of others or we can choose to dwell more on God, who He is and what He has done and can do.  Like the psalmist, choose to dwell on who God is and His actions –  part of the renewal of the mind process.


Contribution by Swee Eng Goh, Singapore


NCFI Cares: How Can We Have Self-Control?


Self-control is probably one of the hardest things to master. How often have we been defeated by a bad habit, a bad attitude, or a wrong mindset? We make promises to improve. We ask someone to hold us accountable. But deep inside, we know that we don’t have the will or the ability to change. We can talk, we can plan, we can read from books, can pray but we still find it difficult to overcome and control many of the things that are inside us!

Thankfully, we know our God knows our weakness, and He also knows the medicine which we need! The Bible says, “The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control” (Gal. 5:22–23). The only way to gain self-control is by allowing the Holy Spirit to control us.

God is not nearly as concerned with our ability as He is with our surrender.

In other words, our key focus is not effort but surrender—to live moment by moment submissively trusting in the Lord rather than in self. Paul says this is what it means to “walk by the Spirit” (v. 16).

Are you ready for a change? You can change, for God is in you and in us. As you surrender control to Him, He will help you bear the fruit of His likeness.

So our new year can be started like this: “I am in need, Lord, of your power so that I might change and grow. I surrender myself to You. Please help me to understand how to be submissive to You that I might be filled with Your Spirit.”

Written by Bulbuli Mollick, Bangladesh, NCFI Board Member

Celebrate 100th NCFI CARES Devotion


NCFI Cares (Caring Across Regions with Encouraging Scripture)

Here are the links mentioned in the video:

CARES: Reflections for Nurses found at NCFI’s Institute of Christian Nursing website.

Lighting the Way: A handbook for Christian Nurses and Midwives

Christian Nursing 101 article 

Email sign-up


Check out the category  “NCFI Cares” for the 99 other devotions!

NCFI Cares: Share A Christmas Hymn

As a young girl, I remember memorizing Silent Night, O’ Little Town of Bethlehem, and The Little Drummer Boy, yet not really paying attention to the lyrics. I would sing the songs in school pageants and throughout out the holiday season. The hymns were really no different than other Santa Claus based children songs, until I became a Christian as an adult. Then, I was amazed at the rich spiritual truth seemingly hidden, yet obvious in Christmas hymns.

My purpose in sharing my story is to encourage you to share the richness of Christmas music with your staff, patients, and friends. Even if O Come, O Come Emmanuel is played amidst Jingle Bells, the amazing truth of our Savior’s birth is announced in the mall, on the radio, and throughout the listening public. People who would never open a Bible, talk about God, nor attend church will worship God while singing Gloria in Excelsis Deo. Also, take a moment this Christmas season to praise the Divine during O’ Holy Night or meditate upon the rich spiritual truth found in Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus

Merry Christmas from NCFI Cares!cf2e1-ncficares_3bloglogo

NCFI Cares: Humility toward Men & Women

The Lord has told you, O man, what is good; And what does the LORD require of you. But to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? (Micah 6:8).

Thankfully, we need to look no further than to Jesus Christ to demonstrate how to “walk humbly with our God”. We readily think of the humble self-sacrifice Christ provided for our redemption (Philippians 2:5-11); additionally Jesus demonstrated his supreme love for mankind by humbly serving others. Andrew Murray’s Humility exclaims that our humility with God is demonstrated by loving our neighbor through sacrificial service to others:

“It is easy to think we humble ourselves before God: humility towards men will be the only sufficient proof that our humility before God is real; that humility has taken up its abode in us; and become our very nature; that we actually, like Christ, have made ourselves of no reputation.” (p. 12).

A perusal of Murray’s work on Humility reflects our Savior’s meek and lowly heart (Matthew 11:29) while revealing a few excellent tips:

-Pray for the Holy Spirit to wash us afresh with the humility of Christ.

-Explore new ways of honor others above ourselves in both home and work.

-Bear upon ourselves the failings and sins of fellow-Christians for the unity of peace

-Look upon every person as a child of God with honor and preference as an esteemed son of a King.

-Praise God most fervently when others are preferred and blessed

Finally, may we seek to live like the Apostle Paul in saying through both word and deed, “I am the least of all the saints”  (Ephesians 3:8).




NCFI Cares: Be Kindness

The Lord has told you, O man, what is good; And what does the LORD require of you. But to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? (Micah 6:8).

Scripture teaches to “put on kindness” like a garment to wear (Colossians 5:12); yet we can change our garment of kindness into selfishness and pride pretty quickly. We also learn that the Holy Spirit working within us brings out the fruit of kindness (Galatians 5:22); yet sometimes our fruit is less sincere and under-ripe. Throughout scripture we see how the kindness of God is demonstrated and extended kindness to others.

Here, in Micah we are instructed that we are to “love kindness” or “mercy” in the KJV. The Hebrew word checed is translated to mercy, goodness, faithfulness and frequently used to describe God as lovingkindness. Notice how Moses, the writer of Exodus, described the LORD’s presence and proclamation.

Then the LORD passed by in front of Moses and proclaimed, “The LORD, the LORD God, compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in lovingkindness (checed) and truth; who keeps lovingkindness (checed)” (Exodus 34:6)

In other words, checed is an attribute or character of God’s presence. Thus, kindness is our presence, our personality, and the essence of our spirit  Checed is not based on a mood, emotion, action or attitude. Instead it should be so greatly ingrained within us that spills out continuously onto others.


NCFI Care: Do Justice



Our turbulent world is in constant turmoil with wars between nations and peoples, and one crisis after another through disasters and violence. Micah, a prophet in the Old Testament, also lived during a period of upheaval and crisis.  According to Bible scholars, Micah’s prophetic purpose was to show Judah that a necessary product of her covenant relationship to God was to be just and holy. Instead of their vain acts of religion through meaningless sacrifices and gaining possessions. They had lost sight of their relationship with God. Micah reiterated the Lord’s character and commands—to love the Lord and to love their neighbors through this amazing verse:

He [the LORD] has told you, O man, what is good; And what does the LORD require of you. But to do justice, to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God? (Micah 6:8).

How can we “do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with our God” during our own turbulent times? In the next 3 NCFI Cares devotions, I will share my insights.

Let’s begin with justice. How can we “do justice” in light of our relationship with the LORD through Jesus Christ?  We can advocate for victims, educate the unlearned, administer health services for the poor, provide basic services for the destitute, and many others. These are many of the things as health care workers we think of for administering justice. Yet, to “do justice” is also more than just following God’s commandments as faithful servants, for then we miss the character of God. Our Lord is a loving Father to the orphan and cares for the widows (Psalm 68:5) and has compassion on all of us (Psalm 103:13-14). Also, when we extend justice to others as a response to the grace and mercy of God we have received, we demonstrate the heart of God to our neighbors and replicate the life and teachings of Jesus.

There will always be inequalities on earth. We live in a sin-saturated imperfect world. Only the return of Christ will end the unjust world we live in. Until then, we can live out “thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10).

Pray with me for the Holy Spirit to open our eyes for opportunities to “do justice” for our neighbors both near and far.