What does the Bible say about our work?

Check out this great article and then bookmark the website.
10 Key Points about Work and the Bible


Celebrate 100th NCFI CARES Devotion


NCFI Cares (Caring Across Regions with Encouraging Scripture)

Here are the links mentioned in the video:

CARES: Reflections for Nurses found at NCFI’s Institute of Christian Nursing website.

Lighting the Way: A handbook for Christian Nurses and Midwives

Christian Nursing 101 article 

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Check out the category  “NCFI Cares” for the 99 other devotions!

Book Review: Spirituality in Nursing: Standing on Holy Ground

 “Perhaps no scriptural theme so well models the spiritual posture of nursing practice ass the Old Testament depiction of Moses and the burning bush. In the biblical narrative God reminded Moses that, when he stood before the Lord, the ground beneath his feet was holy. For it is her, in the act of serving a brother and sister in need, that the nurse truly encounters God.” (p. 1) Mary Elizabeth O’Brien in Spirituality in Nursing:Standing on Holy Ground opening statement sets the stage for the examination of nursing practice in relation to the nurses spirituality in caring for patients, participation in providing holistic care, and the nurse’s role as a healer. O’Brien shares the results of formal and informal observations to provide guidelines for meeting the spiritual needs for the mentally and chronically ill, despair and dying, children and families and others in the diverse practice settings of nursing care.
Quite a few years back, while I reviewing books and articles written by experts, I discovered O’Brien’s Spiritual Assessment Scale (SAS). In my experience there are two-broad categories of spiritual assessment tools: brief and used with patients/clients (FICA, SPIRIT, HOPE, etc); and multidimensional assessments or scales that examine the complex dimensions of spirituality. O’Brien’s SAS captures the multidimensional aspects of spiritual health through the Christian paradigm of a relationship with God: Personal Faith, Religious Practice, and Spiritual Contentment. Since SAS can be used for research and statistical analysis, the scoring is a 5-point Likert scale ranging from “Strongly Disagree” to “Strongly Agree”. Here is an example of an assessment question for each category:
Personal Faith: “I receive strength and comfort from my spiritual beliefs.”
Religious Practice: “My relationship with God is strengthened by personal prayer.”
Spiritual Contentment: “I feel that I have lost God’s love.”
I also want to mention that O’Brien has given permission for NCFI to use the SAS in The Art and Science of Spiritual Care. The scale is used as a self-assessment for examining the participants own spiritual health. Knowing one’s self and caring for one’s spiritual health is an important part of nursing practice and essential to providing spiritual care. 
Spiritual Care is not an “add on” or “alternative/complementary” to nursing practice. This is especially true for Christians. O’Brien invites nurses welcome nurses to stand on holy ground and encounter God through our acts of service in nursing.

My Christian Nursing Mentor

Mary Elizabeth O’Brien is an amazing Christian nursing researcher, scholar, and practitioner.  I discovered her book Spirituality in Nursing: Standing on Holy Ground while in grad school. I was researching Spiritual Care for various papers I wrote, as well as implementing Spiritual Care into an Associate Degree Nursing Program and then with The Art and Science of Spiritual Care: Train-the-Trainer project for Nurses Christian Fellowship International. Later, I discovered her other works and have used them as resources for my books and articles.

Sister Mary Elizabeth is a woman of God, a servant for Christ, and an excellent mentor. Even if it is only through her publications. She merges Scripture with the practice of nursing with a humble, compassionate and gracious spirit.  I owe my maturation as a Christian nurse to her and recommend her works be part of a Christian nurses library.

O'Brien books

 Checkout a review for each of O’Brien’s books on my Facebook page.

NCFI Cares: Be Ordinary


Recently, a leader of a missionary organization affiliated with my church gave an update. During his speech he said, “God has enough people doing the spectacular. He needs more people doing the ordinary.” The truth of his words stuck with me. For even in nursing there are the spectacular that we strive for in comparison to the ordinary. I see the spectacular in nursing as being big, bold and noticeable; whereas the ordinary in nursing is the small, quiet, and unseen. I hesitate to give nursing examples, for what may be big and bold for me, may be different from another nurse’s big and bold.

Jesus provides an excellent example of ordinary work with the Samaritan woman at the well (John 4:1-26). Jesus stops to rest from his travels and relieve his thirst and chats with a woman, isolated and rejected by society. Well, we know the rest of the story, for through Jesus’ ordinary act of drinking water and talking to woman, an entire town meets the long-awaited Messiah.

As we look through the Gospels we see that the majority of Jesus’ teachings and actions, were ordinary conversations with one-on-one moments with individuals or small groups. Yes, he fed and taught large crowds. And yes, his torture and crucifixion was witnessed by hundreds. Yet, he taught his disciples to pray, he healed individuals and post-resurrection he appeared to a few men and women.

Look for opportunities in nursing to be ordinary, so that the Holy Spirit can do the extraordinary and the Lord receives the glory (Matthew 6:4,6; 1 Corinthians 10:30)



“Rejoice in hope, endure in suffering and persist in prayer”. Romans 12:12

An NCFI Value: Respect for All

Another value for NCFI is Respect. The International Council of Nursing (ICN) states “respect for human rights, including the right to life, to dignity, and to be treated with respect”. This statement emphasizes the importance in providing dignified, respectful health care for the promotion of life and health. As Christians our inclusive care for all patients and families is based on Galatians 3:28 “There is neither Jew nor Greencfi-valuesk, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female – for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.” We also have Ephesians 2:11 that says, “God shows no partiality or favoritism” which reminds us that God values all people.

As I reflect on respect as a Christian nursing value and the Lord’s word, I see 2 challenges for nurses.  The first is to not show partiality, but reconcile within our self to provide the same love and grace to ALL persons. Christ encourages us to love them as we would love him no matter what their religion, life style, or criminal behavior (Matthew 25:38-40).

Our second challenge is to respect our colleagues. I think the Lord’s teaching is explicit with Philippians 2:3b, “each of you should, in humility, be moved to treat one another as more important than yourself”.  Whether we are providing nursing services, conducting a meeting, or educating others, the Lord challenges us to have a humble heart of servanthood to our colleagues, our patients, and their families.

Pray for our brothers and sisters in the region of Africa. Click on the link to learn more: NCFI: Africa Region



Book Launch: CARES

In July, CARES: Reflections for Nurses was launched in the United States during a Christian Nursing Brunch. I had the wonderful privilege of being interviewed by a New York Times best selling author, Susy Flory. Not only did I share how CARES came to be, I also shared why the book is bilingual with English and Spanish.

Stay tuned….I will be posting a reading from the Book Launch party!