NCFI Cares: Yahweh Roi: The LORD is My Shepherd

This name for God came from David’s Psalm, 23. As David meditated upon the Lord’s guidance and care throughout his life, he called Yahweh, Roi or Shepherd. David was reminded of his younger days when he was a young shepherd boy caring for a flock of sheep.

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.

He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil:

for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies:

thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life:

and I will dwell in the house of the LORD for ever.

Noticed how David didn’t just say “The Shepherd” he personalized with “my” communicating the intimate relationship David had with his LORD. Then David goes on to describe all that a shepherd does for his sheep, in comparison to all his LORD had done for him.

As New Testament believers, we are even more intimately acquainted with our shepherd, the Great Shepherd, Jesus Christ. He knows us, he calls us by our name, we recognize his voice, and he will lead us (John 10:3, 27).

The beautiful part of Psalm 23 is its familiarity to both Christians and non-Christians. The simplistic verses provide guidance and comfort to even non-believers. Since most people have heard of the passage, it is easy to share with patients and families, colleagues and friends. I encourage you share the timeless truth of Yahweh Roi with others.

Here are a couple options of Psalm 23 to music:God's Name Wordcloud2

Lead Me On by Audrey Assad

Psalm 23 (KJV)

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Christian Nursing 101: Intercessory Prayer: Differentiating the Source

When I first thought about writing this article, I wanted the title to be “Take Back Prayer in Nursing”. That is because I feel we have let prayer, communication between God and man, become a buzzword for anything spiritual. Once a reverent privilege to enter the throne room of God to speak praises, confession, or petitions to our holy Creator. Prayer has been relegated to an existential experience of sending positive thoughts, connecting with the universe, or random words to the unknown. My concern is not with non-Christian and their spiritual journey.  Instead it is with  Christians who espouse their prayers and petitions to a random receiver, or worse to evil spirits.

Thus, the article guides Christian nurses back to the tenets of our faith and Bible teaching on prayer. Since not all prayers are the same, Christians should be cautious when asked to pray for at least two reasons: who we pray to does matter and prayer is more than just reading a few lines.

Finally, we should strongly resist a compulsion to communicate with other gods, energy force or entities by patients, families, or staff. The Bible clearly teaches the \reality of evil spirits or demon world; which is in contradiction to God and Christ.

I would enjoy hearing more about your experience with non-Christian prayer in nursing.

Christian Nursing 101: A Global Heart for Nursing

LargeRollover.00005217-201807000-00000.CVIn this article I share ways nurses can share their global heart in nursing.

I will share with you my most recent prayer petitions for my global colleagues and patients:

The miraculous rescue of the soccer team and coach trapped inside a cave for 2 weeks in Thailand. There were medical teams, including nurses, at the cave site providing health care services to the divers during the planning stages of the rescue. Then, of course, once the boys and their coach were out of the cave, they provided EMS care en route to the hospital and at t hospital.

All 12 boys and soccer coach rescued

Besides the world-wide prayers that went out for the boys, the coach, and the rescue teams. This was also an opportunity to pray for our colleagues diligently working to save lives and restore health.

Share how you extend your nursing heart to our global colleagues.

 

 

 

NCFI Cares: His Chosen Instrument

When you enter the surgical suite or an operating room you will notice the patient, health care staff, various equipment, and an array of instruments. Many of you are probably more familiar with the specific names and functions of each surgical instrument than I am. Yet, each clamp, cutter, extractor, and needles have a specific purpose and use for a myriad of surgical procedures. When surgeons plan their procedures, they request specific instruments for each surgery being performed; and not all surgeons will use the same instruments for the same surgery.  Each individual instrument is chosen and then utilized for the best results.

Just as a surgeon, the Lord chooses and identifies instruments for the work of His Kingdom in the world. We see this in Acts 9:15, Luke shares with us how the Lord identified Paul as a “chosen instrument of mine” to bring the gospel to the Gentiles, kings, and Israel. In Romans 1:1, Paul identified himself as the specific instrument “servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of Christ”.

We are also chosen instruments of the Lord useful for nursing. We are not only useful for nursing and bring an array of knowledge, experience, and expertise, we bring our individual personalities, talents and spiritual gifts. And just like the various surgical instruments, we are all unique and have a specific purpose in the Kingdom of God. What is wonderful about our Master Creator, together we compliment one-another to fulfill the Lord’s plan and purpose

This is what the Lord says to each one of us: But the Lord said to him, “Go, because this man or woman is my chosen instrument to carry my name before Gentiles and kings and the people of Israel patients, family, nurses, health care workers, students, colleagues and fellow Christians. (Acts 9:15)

Praise and thank the Lord for crafting you to be a chosen instrument, useful for nursing and the Kingdom of God.

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p.s. Sign up to receive instant emails from NCFI at ncfi.cares@gmail.com and receive a quarterly prayer guide and other organizational news brought to you by Nurses Christian Fellowship International 

Christian Nursing 101: Responding to Questions about After-Life

Do you believe Heaven is for real? Do you look forward to Heaven? And, if not, why not? As a nurse or health care provider, do you feel confident in your understanding and knowledge of the scriptural basis for Heaven, to share with a Christian patient or family member?

I have provided 3 excellent Christian resources on Heaven to guide your nursing practice and to encourage patients, families, friends, and fellow believers. …check them out. …

Heaven by Randy Alcorn

Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo

Heaven: Your Real Home by Joni Eareckson Tada