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Published! CARES II: Reflections for Nurses

CARES II Front Cover

Yes! It is true. There is a second compilation of NCFI CARES Devotions is available.

NCFI celebrates the publication of the second compilation of NCFI Cares devotions entitled CARES II: Reflections of Nurses. The Lord’s timing cannot go unnoticed. For, as the world continues to grapple with the Coronavirus Pandemic, stress for nurses and midwives is at an all-time high. As the heart and hands of health care it is important that each individual nurse feels assured as vital member body of Christ and the global nursing profession. Christian nurses need encouragement, support, and prayers to persevere and stand firm in their faith.

The reflections are written by diverse authors from around the world that inspire peace, strength, and hope amidst the challenges of Christian nursing. They include practical advice on staying calm, responding to conflict, and rekindling our joy while opening our hearts to how Jesus can guide our nursing practice. Whether you work in the hospital, clinic, university, or ministry, all Christian nurses will be encouraged professionally and personally. Each reflection begins with a central scripture and a brief teaching or insight. Unique to CARES II is the inclusion of an accompanying passage of scripture, reflective question, and a simple prayer.  They can be used for a personal prayer/devotional time or part of connecting a nursing fellowship groups.

CARES II is published in a bilingual English/Spanish book and an English only book. For a FREE PDF download visit the NCFI CARES webpage.

Or purchase from Amazon: English OR the bilingual English/Spanish

Be sure to check out Nurses Christian Fellowship International (NCFI) website for more information about the ministry to nurses around the world. https://ncfi.org/

NCFI Cares Joshua’s Leadership Tip #2 Change Your Perspective

When Joshua was by Jericho, he lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, a man was standing before him with his drawn sword in his hand. And Joshua went to him and said to him, Are you for us, or for our adversaries? And he said, No; but I am the commander of the army of the Lord. Now I have come. And Joshua fell on his face to the earth and worshiped and said to him, What does my lord say to his servant? And the commander of the Lord’s army said to Joshua, Take off your sandals from your feet, for the place where you are standing is holy. And Joshua did so.

Joshua 5:13-15 ESV

Joshua experienced amazing miracles in his life prior to becoming the leader of the Israelites. He witnessed the plagues in Egypt, the parting of the Red Sea, the miracles of manna, and the stopping of the Jordan river. As he prepares to take on the city of Jericho, he comes face-to-face with the Captain of the Lord’s Army, the pre-incarnate Jesus Christ (1). Every time I read the passage; I stop in awe at the encounter. I wonder what it would have been like to have the visible Jesus Christ suddenly appear. I imagine walking around my campus strategizing who will teach a course, how can I recruit faculty, and what will happen if I have to cancel classes or delay graduation. I can imagine being deep in thought when suddenly I look up and see a strange man standing before me. I most likely would not think he is an enemy. Instead, I could see myself asking him if he could help me with my problems, especially if he was dressed as a nurse. I am that desperate! 

Instead of answering my question, the man responds, “I am the Commander of the Army of the Lord. Now I have come.”  Like Joshua, I would fall face down in shock. I have to admit, I would be too dumbstruck to respond in reverence to the Son of God. Maybe after a few minutes, I might be able to pull myself together enough to at least listen to what he had to say. I doubt it though.

Beyond my personal reflection behind, I find profound meaning behind the encounter between the Commander of the Lord’s Army and Joshua. There were two principles communicated to Joshua:

The first one is for Joshua to realize God’s claim over him and His purposes.

“We tend to approach our battles and causes backward; we turn things around and try to marshal God to support us rather than to submit and follow Him…Joshua, as with all of us in the army of the King, must be following the Lord, submitting to His authority, taking our orders from Him, and resting the battle in His hands because we realize it is really His battle as the Supreme Commander.” (1)

In other words, instead of seeking God to provide wisdom for my problems in nursing; I need to submit and follow God. Instead of being stressed and racking my brain for solutions, I need to follow Joshua’s example and state, “What has my Lord to say to his servant?” After Joshua replied, the Lord provided directions for taking Jericho, which, if you read on through Chapter 6, was not a military maneuver.

The second principle is the commander brings God’s powerful provision and personal presence.

“The promise of God’s personal presence always carries with it the assurance of God’s personal care. Likewise, the promise of His powerful provision always carries with it the promise of His infinite supply and power no matter how impossible the problem may appear to us.” (1)

When I recently asked the question, “What has my Lord to say to his servant?” The Lord replied, “It’s all mine and I will tell you what to do.” His answer changed my perspective. Yes, I still am looking for instructors to teach.  Yet now, I wake up and ask the question and do what I can to solve the many problems. I don’t get stressed and am not afraid of worst-case scenarios. It is up to God, and he will decide what the future brings. He will tell me what I need to know when I need to know it. I wait for His directions, and when they come, I act. I take them one step at a time, expecting God’s personal presence and waiting on God’s powerful provisions to address the challenges I face.

(1) Keathley, J. Hampton, Studies in the Life of Joshua. 4.Consecrating the People (Joshua 5:1-15)

Moral Courage for Pro-life

Have you ever felt like the Lord had you on faith journey that you were completely unaware of it until all the pieces came together. This recently happened to me in regards to abortion.

Approximately 45 days ago (#of days is important, so hang on), I was perusing our local catholic website. Even though, I am not catholic, my husband and I have attended events. As I was scrolling on the website, an advertisement for 40 Days for Life. I clicked on the link and learned about the organization.

40 Days for Life is a community-based campaign that draws attention to the evil of abortion through the use of prayer and fasting, peaceful vigil, and community outreach. They take a determined, peaceful approach to showing local communities the consequences of abortion. It puts into action a desire to cooperate with God in the carrying out His plan for the end of abortion in America. The 40-day campaign tracks Biblical history, where God used 40-day periods to transform individuals, communities…and the entire world.

To say the Lord “smacked me” sounds violent and crazy. It was violent to my spirit! God called me out.

I felt like God drew a line in the sand and said, “Carrie, I am opposed to killing babies! Where are you?” Theologically we can’t lose our salvation. Yet, I knew God was giving me an ultimatum in regards to my relationship with Him. It took me two-seconds to fall to my knees weeping and saying, “Of course, Lord. I love you and will always love you!”

I immediately ordered a sweatshirt, 40 days Devotion book and the book What to Say When: The Complete New Guide to Discussing Abortion. I knew I needed to get informed and empowered by the Holy Spirit. I started the 40 Days for Life fast guided by the Holy Spirit. Thus, the Lord’s timing was perfect with when I became informed.

I also watch the movie Unplanned about Abbey Johnson, a Christian mom, who worked as a clinical manager for Planned Parenthood. You can stream it for FREE on Tubi, AmazonPrime, Vudu, and other services.

A few comments…

  1. If you are old enough to remember the Pro-life movement being violent, hateful and grotesque, then I invite you to peruse 40 Days for Life. They are a peaceful, science-based, multi-faith organization that reaches out to everyone affected by abortion (women, unborn babies, abortion workers, ex-planned parenthood employees, and doctors).
  2. Sometimes we find ourselves on the fence with issues. I will admit I was never, per se Pro-Choice, but I had justified abortions in cases of rape, incest, and did not want abortions to return to “back-alley” procedures. The Lord set me straight on His truth and where I needed to be. As a Christian who holds firmly on the truth of the Bible, I needed to be disciplined and reproofed in righteousness (2 Timothy 3:16).
  3. Pray and search out the scientific proof and Biblical proof. They align together. Life begins at conception and God’s is the creator of all life. He intimately knows each human, even in the womb (Psalm 139).

God had been leading me to this point through many small steps. Now I just pray for the moral courage to live out His truth in love and grace.

The Call for Ethnic Reconciliation

One Blood by John M. Perkins

I became a Christian as an adult at the age of 28. Since the church I attended was a diverse with people from all ethnicity and cultures, I assumed Christianity did not have racism or racial divisions. Since that time, some 30 years ago, I have learned the truth. How Christian white slave owners justified slavery and racism using the Bible. How during the Civil Rights movement in Christian denominations split to provide segregated churches. I was aghast at this evilness done in the name of Jesus.

I began to pray for the church to be the leader of love and grace to all peoples:

There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.

Galatians 3:28 (NASB)

With my heart and soul on the future found in Revelation 7:9

After these things I looked, and behold, a great multitude which no one could count, from every nation and all tribes and peoples and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, and palm branches were in their hands;

At the same time continue to reach out in love and grace to all my brothers and sisters in Christ while trying to understand their perspective and experiences. (Side note…why I love NCFI!) Because I am an unapologetic book worm, I continued to read books on the subject from many great Christian writers.

I recently became aware of John M. Perkins book One Blood. This was the answer to my prayers. My women’s group read and discussed the book. It was a great experience to listen to my sisters talk about their experiences and views.

In the meantime, leaders from many churches in the Bay Area had been discussing how to respond to the deaths and hatred acts towards Blacks, Asians, and other racially motivated events. My pastor was part of this group and began inviting various parishioners to participate in One Blood Bible Study and Discussion. I immediately joined the study.

The problem is that there is a gaping hole in the gospel. We have preached a gospel that leaves us believing that we can be reconciled to God but not reconciled to our Christian brothers and sisters who don’t look like us–brothers and sisters with whom we are, in fact, one blood. (p. 17)

I am committed to praying and doing my part to live out the gospel of reconciliation to all people!

NCFI Cares: Joshua’s Leadership Tip #1 Stand in Confidence

After the death of Moses the servant of the LORD, that the LORD spoke to Joshua the son of Nun, Moses’ servant, saying, “Moses My servant is dead; so now arise, cross this Jordan, you and all this people, to the land which I am giving to them, to the sons of Israel. Every place on which the sole of your foot steps, I have given it to you, just as I spoke to Moses.

Joshua 1:1-3 (NASB)

God promised Moses, Joshua, and the Israelites through his covenant with Abraham that they would possess the land (Genesis 15:7; Exodus 3:17). As the successor to Moses, Joshua stood firm on God’s promise to Moses, “Every place you put your feet, I will give you.” The promise was beyond the teachings of Moses and was made real as they entered the land to possess it. Every Israelite could look down where they stood and say, “This is my promised land.”

We face seemingly unsurmountable challenges in nursing. Yet, as Christian nurse leaders we can have the same confidence as Joshua. The Lord promised us spiritual blessings.  Keathley’s teaching on Joshua states:

“…from the moment of salvation, God has provided every believer with every spiritual blessing and provision. Of course, as this book (Joshua) makes perfectly clear, having a title deed to the land (or our blessings in Christ) does not mean our lives will be without testing, conflict, struggles, and pressures. It indeed will, but since the battle is the Lord’s, since God has done the most for us in Christ, with the testings and temptations comes God’s deliverance through faith and the application of the Word.” (1)

As we nurses go forward in confidence, we will need to be creative and steadfast in solving the nursing crisis. One way you can stand in confidence is to regularly prayer-walk through your workplace. For example, if you work in a hospital, walk down each hallway, patient room, office, eating area, conference room, and other areas to pray.

Here is a simple prayer:
“O, holy, sovereign God. This is Your hospital, and You are working here. You have blessed me by being called a nurse. I am an instrument of Yours equipped to bring your love, grace, and truth to my colleagues, my patients, and families. I give You thanks God, who in Christ always leads me in triumphal procession, and through us spreads the fragrance of the knowledge of You everywhere. Amen.”

Hebrews 13:21; 2 Corinthians 2:14

The Israelites faced many challenges. Through Joshua’s innovative leadership skills guided by God, he led the Israelites to conquer the land and begin their new life. God says the same thing to us as he said to Joshua, “o one will be able to oppose you all the days of your life. Just as I have been with Moses, I will be with you; I will not desert you nor abandon you.” (Joshua 1:5 NASB)

Whether you are a nurse leader in a hospital, clinic, home care, or in academics, like me, we need timeless guidance from great leaders like Joshua. A devout follower of God who served God in his work and in his home.

NCFI Cares: Fit To Be A Leader

Remember your leaders, those who spoke to you the word of God. Consider the outcome of their way of life, and imitate their faith. Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.

Hebrews 13:7-8 (ESV)

We know Joshua as an amazing leader, but who was he before the book of Joshua? First, his name means “Jehovah is salvation” and when used in the New Testament, it is the same word for “Jesus” (see Hebrew 4:6). Joshua was born a slave in Egypt. He shared in all the events of the Exodus and held the place of commander of the Israelites at their great battle against the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-16).

Joshua was Moses’ minister or servant and accompanied him part of the way when he ascended Mount Sinai to receive the two tablets (Exodus 32:17). Joshua was also one of the twelve spies sent by Moses to explore the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:16,17). Joshua and Caleb were the only men who gave an encouraging report. Commentators believe both men were 40 years old when they were sent out. Thus, Joshua was 80 years old when he was commissioned by God to be Moses’ successor.

Bible scholar Dr. McGee says the following about Joshua “He was a man of prayer, courage, dependence upon God, faith, leadership, enthusiasm, and fidelity. He is a type of Christ in name and work.”

As we begin to study the leadership style of Joshua, we can reflect on our own steadfast faith and professional calling in nursing.  As Christians, we don’t rely solely upon the world’s definitions of leadership.  Instead, we bring both our faith in Christ and nursing excellence to characterize our leadership.

If you are someone who says, “I can’t be a leader.” or “I am not leadership material,” then this final anonymous quote is for you.

“Joshua shows that a man of average ability may become a leader in the church. He received his call not in flaming letters across the sky, but from an old man, who knew God and knew Joshua, and saw that he was fitted by God to be a leader.” (McGee)

Let God fit you to be His leader!

Prayer: Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen. (Hebrews 13:20-21)

Briefing the Bible by Dr. J. Vernon McGee © Thru the Bible, www.ttb.org

https://ttb.org/resources/briefing-the-bible

NCFI Cares: Big Shoes of Leadership Includes a Plan for Success

This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it; for then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will achieve success.

Joshua 1:8

As Joshua stepped into the big shoes of leadership the Lord not only provided courage to lead, He provided a plan for success:

Just as I have been with Moses, I will be with you; I will not desert you nor abandon

you…be careful to do according to all the Law which Moses My servant commanded you;

do not turn from it to the right or to the left, so that you may achieve success wherever

you go. This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on

it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it; for

then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will achieve success. Have I not

commanded you? Be strong and courageous! Do not be terrified nor dismayed, for the LORD your God is with you wherever you go.

Joshua 1:5-9

The Lord provides us with the same plan He gave to Joshua:

  • Don’t Panic — trust God with all your misgivings, doubts, fears, etc., and He will guide your steps.
  • Focus on the Word–like Moses, Joshua, Billy Graham and other great Christians, our strength is found in obedience to the Word.
  • You have a Partner–God is faithful and is with you always.

Whether you have a title, position, or specific calling, all nurses are leaders. Our big shoes of leadership are probably not as big as Moses’ shoes; but like Joshua you are to lead others following Christian principles.

Read: Joshua 1:1-9

Reflect: Which component of God’s plan for Joshua’s leadership is the most challenging for you?

Prayer: Holy Lord, just as You guided Joshua in filling in Big Shoes of leadership left behind by Moses, guide us in filling in Big Shoes of Leadership in our facilities, schools, and clinics. Amen.

*Previously published in CARES II: Reflections for Nurses. Available as a free pdf on the NCFI website or as a paperback book on Amazon. Learn more about the nurses devotional compilations entitled CARES Reflections for Nurses and CARES II!

NCFI Cares: Leadership Tips from Joshua

Nurses around the world are experiencing burnout and compassion fatigue. The demands from the coronavirus pandemic have created a crisis in nursing. Nurses are leaving their units, facilities, and the profession. The results are devastating with a horrendous shortage of nurses to care for patients, teach students, and manage clinics and hospitals. Now more than ever health care and academics needs effective nurse leaders to navigate through these difficult times.

In the book of Joshua there are timeless leadership guidance from the life of Joshua, who was tasked with leading the Israelites into the promised land. The Israelites had spent 40 years in the desert and were only familiar with the nomadic life of desert living. Joshua led them to conquer cities and adjust to a new way of life while following God’s laws—a monumental challenge.

In the next series of devotions, we will explore the amazing leadership of Joshua. To get us started, we will look at what the Lord said to Joshua in preparation for his leadership role. These devotions were previously published in CARES II: Reflections for Nurses.

Big Shoes of Leadership Includes Courage

[The Lord said,] “Just as I have been with Moses, I will be with you; I will not desert you nor abandon you. Be strong and courageous.”

Joshua 1:5-6

Nurses are called into leadership positions and as Christians we should take these opportunities to have a greater influence towards Christ-centered nursing. At the same time, the big shoes of leadership can be daunting and overwhelming, causing many nurses to decline the opportunity.

When Joshua took Moses’ place as Israel’s leader, he had big shoes to fill. For 40 plus years, Moses had been the spokesman for God, the giver of the law, the indwelling presence of I AM, the warrior against Pharaoh’s army, builder of a nation and caregiver of God’s people. He not only directed the building of the tabernacle and guided them to daily sustenance of manna and doves, Moses governed the legal, political, and economic status of a nomadic, rebellious nation.

How could Joshua, Moses’ attendant, step into those huge leadership shoes? Was Joshua frightened, worried, or anxious? Did he doubt his ability to be a leader that Israel would follow? Was he afraid of disappointing the Lord? Was he afraid to follow in the footsteps of his predecessor and never witness the fruition of his labors because of disobedience? These were big shoes to fill. Was Joshua ready for the challenge?

We have insight into Joshua’s concerns and his need for assurance from the Lord. The Lord tells Joshua, “Be strong and courageous.” In fact, the exhortation is repeated 3 times. (Joshua 1:6, 7, 9). Today, the Lord speaks to you with the same encouragement: Be strong and courageous. The Lord will be with you, just as He was with Moses, Joshua, and other leaders.

Read: Joshua 1:1-9

Reflect: Have you declined a leadership position due to fear or concern about your abilities? If so, ask the Lord to open your heart to His courage in following His guidance.

Prayer: O’ Lord, I will not be dismayed, nor tremble for You provide me with courage to lead. Amen.

*Previously published in CARES II: Reflections for Nurses. Available as a free pdf on the NCFI website or as a paperback book on Amazon. Learn more about the nurses devotional compilations entitled CARES Reflections for Nurses and CARES II!

NCFI Cares: Next Steps on Our Journey

“Then it shall come about when the Lord your God brings you into the land which He swore to your fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, to give you, great and splendid cities which you did not build, and houses full of all good things which you did not fill, and hewn cisterns which you did not dig, vineyards and olive trees which you did not plant, and you eat and are satisfied, then watch yourself, that you do not forget the Lord who brought you from the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.”

Deuteronomy 6:10-12

Many of us have been in or are still in a wilderness journey with COVID, job struggles, family problems, grief from loss of loved ones, and other personal experiences. As we continue to trudge along we can find hope in Moses’ guiding words to the Israelites.

As the Israelites prepared to enter the Promised Land, Moses reminded them of their experiences in Egypt and the judgements they had witnessed. He pointed out how God had provided for their every need including shoes still in good shape and clothes that had not worn out for 40 years (Deuteronomy 29:5). In addition, God had not only protected them from their enemies, but He had also taken another nation’s land and given it to the Israelites (Deuteronomy 29)

Moses guiding words included next steps for the Israelites:

  • Remember their slavery in Egypt.
  • Remember how God loved and cared for them in the desert.
  • Take possession of the land.
  • Do not let the blessings of the new land lead them sin.
  • Love and obey God enjoying the blessing he gave them.

God promised the Israelites that if they would stay faithful to him, they would keep their promised inheritance (Deuteronomy 30:20).

As we live in our wilderness journey we can follow Moses’ advice and look to our promised inheritance of eternal life:

  • Remember times when God freed you from your past and/or sin(s).
  • Remember God loves and cares for you during this time
    • May be helpful to list what you do have (food, clothes, shelter, etc.)
  • Possess the abundant life you have in Christ (faith, hope, love, joy, peace, endurance, and strength)
  • Do not let fleshly desires and the temptations of the world lead to sin
  • Return to abiding in Christ through prayer, worship and living in the Word

I love the practicality of God’s word to the Israelites found in Deuteronomy 30:11-14:

 “For this commandment which I command you today is not too difficult for you, nor is it out of reach. It is not in heaven, that you should say, ‘Who will go up to heaven for us to get it for us and make us hear it, that we may observe it?’ Nor is it beyond the sea, that you should say, ‘Who will cross the sea for us to get it for us and make us hear it, that we may observe it?’  But the word is very near you, in your mouth and in your heart, that you may observe it.”

In other words, God says, “You Got this!”

NCFI Cares: Intercession with The Lord’s Prayer

“Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.”

Matthew 6:13

The Lord’s Prayer found in Matthew 6:9-13 is Jesus’ response to the disciples’ request, “Teach us to pray.”

Our Father who is in heaven,
Hallowed be Your name.
Your kingdom come,
Your will be done,
On earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
And forgive us our debts,
as we also have forgiven our debtors.
And do not lead us into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.
For Yours is the kingdom and the power
and the glory, forever. Amen (NASB).

There are countless books, Bible studies, and sermon topics written on this timeless prayer. Depending upon your faith tradition, you may be quite familiar with the Lord’s prayer. The prayer may be part of corporate worship or a liturgy for personal prayer. The prayer can also provide a template of sorts to intercede for believers and non-believers alike.

As we bring friends, families and colleagues concerns to prayer, we recognize that we have a holy, loving Father who cares for everyone, the saved and the unsaved. We petition, first and foremost, for His will to be accomplished and His just and merciful kingdom found in heaven to come to earth.  The recognition and verbal proclamation of God’s name, God’s kingdom, and God’s will reminds us of His purpose and plan for others.

With our hearts and spirits focused on the Divine, we can make requests for others. Through the petition for daily bread, we recognize that a loving Heavenly Father daily meets all physical and temporal needs. We ask for nothing more and nothing less than the Father’s provision for this basic necessity.

Just as He meets the physical, the Holy Father meets our primary spiritual need, forgiveness. The first request is for others to receive forgiveness from the Father; with an immediate recognition that the gift of mercy is based upon extending mercy to others.

A final necessity is a petition for the Spirit’s help in thwarting temptation and deliverance from evil. Two simple requests that recognizes the balance of power we consistently face. Yet, we do not lose heart in our intercessory prayer for others. We conclude with bold proclamation of God’s kingdom, power, and glory will exist eternally. Amen.

Blessings, Carrie

NCFI CARES: Submit to God at Work

Be subject for the Lord’s sake…For this is the will of God, that by doing good you should put to silence the ignorance of foolish people. Live people who are free, not using your freedom as a cover-up for evil, but living as servants of God

(1 Peter 2:13, 15-16)

Throughout my time as a nurse, I have dialogued with many nurses who were looking at changing jobs. Prior to the high stress and demands of caring for patients with the coronavirus infection, Christian nurses’ complaints focused on unkind coworkers and/or harsh work environments as a result of their faith. Nurses shared how they couldn’t talk about their personal faith at work. One nurse said, “Forget inviting colleagues to church. I was afraid to even share how involved my family was in church. A few nurses on my unit began badgering me about being ‘one of those people.’ ”

Another nurse shared when he was doing his devotion and praying in the break room. He was firmly told by the charge nurse, “Don’t bring your Jesus here!” It was made more confusing because the unit was working on implementing caring into the unit. The manager had encouraged a group time of “meditation” and “centering.”

These nurses and others were praying about transferring units or leaving the hospital.  As I listened to their concern and assisted them with navigating these complex issues of faith and work, I was reminded of how we are the hands and heart of God.  Wherever we work, we bring the love and grace of God to everyone. This isn’t just a spiritual truth; it is reality of what Christ has called for His followers. In my experience, the Lord will purposefully place a believer in a hostile, unwelcoming work environment. Not for the nurse’s convenience or comfort. Instead, God needs someone to bring Himself to the people.  If we don’t go, who will show God’s grace to our colleagues? Who will demonstrate God’s love if we aren’t there to pray for their loved ones? How can our colleagues find the peace of Christ if we don’t show them?

I challenge everyone wanting to leave their workplace, to spend time in prayer seeking the Holy Spirit. You may not need to leave. Instead, you may need a fresh passion and strength to be the light God wants to use in your workplace. In addition, you may need prayer and support from Christian nursing colleagues. No matter what decision you make, find strength in the Word and in fellowship.

My prayer for you: “Now may the Lord direct your hearts toward the love of God and the endurance of Christ.” (2 Thessalonians 3:5)