NCFI Cares: Wait, Wait, and Wait, BUT

77ba6-ncficares_3bloglogoDear all,

I am going to share an interesting things here today for all of us. When we go outside for meeting people, we have to take an appointment and have to wait for that time and sometimes need more time even we have given a specific time.

We have to; Wait, Wait and Wait BUT

Interestingly, the Creator of the Universe, the Eternal God, has made Himself available for me or us 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. Yet I am often preoccupied with lesser activities instead of availing myself to His offer – His presence, His attentive ear, and His guidance. How sad that I/we would ignore so great an opportunity.

Repeatedly, Jesus said to those who would follow Him, “…come…”.  (Mark 1:17) 

He has made Himself available. Will we join today and this week in availing ourselves to the wonder of God’s Presence? We don’t need to make an appointment. Just take some time and talk to him, tell him our problem and come more close to HIM.

In Bangladesh last few weeks we prayed a lot, many people in many places for LAMB, for our staff safety, for our Bangladesh but that week is not enough for us. As a Christian leader and a Christian person, we have to pray to him all the time even when we are walking on the path, even we meeting with the people, whether we are happy or even sad, can just tell our God, please God blessed us through this meeting and help us to talk nicely, protect us from any evil spirit, keep us healthy, give us your wisdom and peace in our mind, give us whatever we need.

Guest Contributor:  Bulbuli Mollick, Bangladesh, NCFI International Board Member

Prayer Point:  Every issue of NCFI Cares will come with a prayer point to encourage your prayerful support of nurses around the world.

This month take time to pray for the leaders in your national fellowship. If you are unfamiliar with them, then click on NCFI Website. Look across the top menu and find Regions. Here you will find links and contact information for your national fellowship.

NCFI Cares: My Work Christ’s Home

Christ at hearts-door

Christ at Heart’s Door by Warner Sallman

 Jesus said, “If a man love me, he will keep my words; and my Father will love him, and we will come into him, and make our abode with him.” (John 14:23)

When I was a brand new baby Christian more than 24 years ago, a fellow believer gave me a novella entitled “My Heart Christ’s Home” written by Robert Boyd Munger (1951). The story is about a new Christian with Christ in his heart, inviting the Lord into all areas of his life through the metaphor of a home. For example, when the new believer shows Christ the library and the recreational room, Christ points out the importance of inviting Christ into our reading and into leisurely activities. We as believers can compartmentalize our Christianity. Meaning we keep Christ on Sunday and our family, but we may be tempted to leave our faith out of our non-Christian relationships, television or movie choices, or our work environment,

As I reflected on the simple, yet powerful truths found in the novella, I thought of nursing. As Christian nurses we seek to live out Christ’s life and teachings in our clinics, schools, and/or hospitals. Christ doesn’t want to just come into the comfortable areas of our work and reside as a guest. Christ wants to dwell in every work relationship, every patient encounter, every project, class and meeting.

I encourage you to take time to allow Christ to walk through each area of nursing. Even though, many of us are mature believers, I am sure each of us will find a locked closet, a dusty cabinet, or even a hidden room that we have kept from his Spirit. The good news is we can always repent.  “I saw it in a minute and dropping to my knees, I said, “Lord, You have been a guest and I have been the host. From now on I am going to be the servant. You are going to be the owner and Master and Lord.” (Munger)

Click on the link for free pdf of My Heart Christ Home.

NCFI Cares: Power Up!

As we stand firm in truth, righteousness, and peace we need a protective shield to guard our spirit from the flaming arrows of Satan. Thankfully we have a shield of faith. This is not the strength of our belief or faith as a defense weapon. Nor does it come from our ability to believe it works. Instead it is based on fidelity, “the character of the one who can be relied upon.” Thus, our shield of faith comes from the attributes or character of Christ. Jesus is all powerful, all knowing and demonstrates sovereignty over heaven and earth throughout all of time (Revelation 5:12-13; 22:13).

Outfitted with our nursing uniform for spiritual warfare, we might imagine ourselves as a children’s fictional superhero. Who, when confronted by an evil villain, transforms into a supercharged warrior. Our essential garment includes a helmet to protect our thoughts and we stand secured in the righteousness of our Redeemer. We expertly yield our sword while protecting our self with a shield of faith. We are fastened by truth found in Christ while attuned to where our peaceful sandals leads us (Ephesians 6:13-17)

Next time, we see flaming arrows of Satan locked onto our spirit. We can “power up” our nursing uniform fortified in the power of our Mighty Warrior.

 

Prayer: Our Lord is faithful to strengthen you and protect you from the evil one while directing your hearts toward his love and the endurance of Christ, amen. (1 Thessalonians 3:3-5)77ba6-ncficares_3bloglogo

My grief memoir

Debbie and I

Debbie and I

I have really struggled to write a blog about my sister’s death, my grieving, and the memoir I am currently writing.  I know part of the challenge is where to start.  Do I begin by listing the facts, like an obituary notice? Or do I begin by writing about the “phone call”?Receiving the dreaded phone call seems like a blog posting in of itself. I can say I received a phone call in February, 2013 that my younger sister had been found dead. She had died in her sleep. It was later ruled an accidental overdose, for a medication she was taking had a slightly higher than normal amount. She was only 43 and left behind a husband and two sons.

I found out about her death the next morning when my parents made “the phone call.” Like any family member who has lost their loved ones, I was an emotional basket case. I was catapulted into a new reality. Like the Matrix, I felt that there was part of me living in one dimension and the other part living in a different dimension. My grief is no worse than someone else’s pain, yet my grief was and is complicated.  We came from a dysfunctional childhood with  alcoholism, domestic violence, and incest. But, and a big BUT, the hope and healing through Jesus Christ that I experienced 20+ years ago continues to guide me through a maze of emotions and memories.

My hope and prayer is that others who have had complicated childhoods and/or catapulted prematurely down a grief journey will be encouraged by my grief experience.

“The Lord is a refuge and a fortress” Psalm 91:1

join the discussion: #griefsoup

@carriedameron

NCFI Cares: “Come Quickly, Lord”

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Our discussion of a heavenly hope and a place without sickness brings us closer to the end of this time—the return of Jesus Christ. This hope is based on the promises made by Jesus Christ to the disciples as recorded in the gospels—“Do not be troubled, I go to prepare a place for you and I will return to take you there to live with me” (John 14:1-3, Matthew 24:29–31). In Christian language we call this event, The Second Coming. Even though the timing of the event is unknown, we have a description of Jesus’ impending arrival:

For the Lord himself will come down from heaven with a shout of command, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trumpet of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive, who are left, will be suddenly caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will always be with the Lord. (1 Thessalonians 4:16-17).

Just like modern day Christians, the believers during Paul’s time were asking, “When will Jesus return?” And like us, the wait seems endless. Especially when violence spreads through our countries and new diseases and plagues continue to inflict suffering and pain upon us and our patients.  It is easy to become discouraged.  We may fluctuate between impatience with frustrating cries of “WHEN Lord!” versus murmuring in apathy. “Whatever, Lord.”

Paul, the writer to the believers in Thessalonica, knew they needed more than just a reminder, they needed to have hope. Thus, he encouraged them to support one another and to maintain vigilance.

Let’s takes Paul’s advice. As we anticipate and wait for Jesus to return, we can pray and inspire our fellow believers to stay steadfast, while at the same time hasten the Lord to “come” quickly (Revelation 22:17, 20)

We wait for the happy fulfillment of our hope in the glorious appearing of our great God and Savior, Jesus Christ. (Titus 2:13)

p.s. For those who lost loved ones in the Malaysian Flight MH17, please know our hearts are broken at your loss and our prayers fill the Lord’s chamber with tears and sadness.

Importance of Hope

JCN cover        If someone were to ask you, “What is the one word to describe Christianity?” How would you respond? You might say Jesus, love, or trust, but would you use the word hope? I have to admit, I would not have previously explained  Christianity using the word of hope.
Hope is the basis of Christianity, for without the death and resurrection of Christ, our faith is meaningless and we are without hope (1 Corinthians 15:4).
The article “Importance of Hope” in the Journal Christian Nursing  can be a basis for a bible study for building a strong foundation of hope in Christ and in the promises of God:
  • look up each scripture cited in the article
  • spend time in prayer and meditation
  • seek the Lord to open your heart and mind to the truth contained in the passage
  • explore ways to live out hope personally and professionally
  • examine your life for areas of insecurity, worry, fear etc (evidences of a lack of hope)
  • conclude your time by thanking the Lord for his hope, rooted and found in Him
NCFI Cares will be encouraging international nurses to “overflow with hope” (Romans 15:13) with devotionals exploring the facets of hope. You can receive NCFI Cares via NCFI facebook page,  subscribing to the category NCFI Cares, or follow me on Twitter!
My prayer for you:
May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace as you trust in him, so that you may overflow with hope by the power of the Holy Spirit (Romans 15:13), amen.

NCFI Cares: Easter Message

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1Who believes what we’ve heard and seen?

Who would have thought God’s saving power would look like this?

2-6The servant grew up before God—a scrawny seedling, a scrubby plant in a parched field.
There was nothing attractive about him, nothing to cause us to take a second look.
He was looked down on and passed over, a man who suffered, who knew pain firsthand.
One look at him and people turned away. We looked down on him, thought he was scum.
But the fact is, it was our pains he carried—our disfigurements, all the things wrong with us.
We thought he brought it on himself, that God was punishing him for his own failures.
But it was our sins that did that to him, that ripped and tore and crushed him—our sins!
He took the punishment, and that made us whole. Through his bruises we get healed.
We’re all like sheep who’ve wandered off and gotten lost. We’ve all done our own thing, gone our own way. And God has piled all our sins, everything we’ve done wrong, on him, on him.

 

7-9He was beaten, he was tortured, but he didn’t say a word.
Like a lamb taken to be slaughtered and like a sheep being sheared, he took it all in silence.
Justice miscarried, and he was led off—and did anyone really know what was happening?
He died without a thought for his own welfare, beaten bloody for the sins of my people.
They buried him with the wicked, threw him in a grave with a rich man,
Even though he’d never hurt a soul or said one word that wasn’t true.

10 Still, it’s what God had in mind all along, to crush him with pain.
The plan was that he give himself as an offering for sin so that he’d see life come from it—life, life, and more life. And God’s plan will deeply prosper through him.

11-12 Out of that terrible travail of soul, he’ll see that it’s worth it and be glad he did it.
Through what he experienced, my righteous one, my servant, will make many “righteous ones,”
as he himself carries the burden of their sins.

Therefore I’ll reward him extravagantly—the best of everything, the highest honors—
Because, he looked death in the face and didn’t flinch, because he embraced the company of the lowest. He took on his own shoulders the sin of the many, he took up the cause of all the black sheep.

Isaiah 53

“Scripture taken from The Message. Copyright © 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2001, 2002. Used by permission of NavPress Publishing Group.”