NCFI Cares: The Cross-Cultural Mission Field at our Workplace

Throughout scripture we see the Apostles bringing the love of God and grace of Christ to various cultures and religions. The most dramatic is Philip, who was led by the Holy Spirit to travel to a specific road in Gaza to meet with the Ethiopian court official (Acts 8:27-39). He explains the passage of Isaiah and then proceeds to lead the official to salvation and baptism. Earlier in Samaria Philip had provided physical and spiritual healing to Simon, a magician who practiced in the dark arts (Acts 8:9-13).

Reaching out cross-culturally to bring the love and grace of Christ to others, doesn’t have to be a call to the mission field. We can bring the love of God and grace of Christ cross culturally to those within our sphere of influence. We can connect one-on-one with people around us and explore their religion, country of origin or ethnicity. Here are some ideas to get started:

–Take extra time to talk with a patient or their family exploring their home life.

–Have lunch with a coworker and learn about their religious practices

–Connect with a student and discover their cultural traditions.

As Christians we have the tendency to spend time with only Christians and like-minded individuals. Instead, with the influx of immigrants in most nations and the diversity of global travelers, we have an opportunity to learn about various cultures and religions right within our work environment. As we take time to pray for our coworkers, our patients and/or our students, we can spread the love God has for all his children through our conversations and professional relationships.  

Also, don’t be afraid to talk with those who practice in the evil arts. Get to know these religion/practices, seek prayer support from your pastor, and then hold on to God’s promises, “He that is in me and you is greater than he that is in the world.” (1 John 4:4). How else can those from various religions ever learn about the love of God and the saving grace of Jesus Christ.

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Christian Nursing 101: Forgiveness in the Workplace?

Like many workers in health care or all workers experience conflict and even incivility in the workplace. And even if it isn’t as extreme as incivility or lateral violence, we experience angry colleagues, disgruntled employees, and/or emotional outburst; and probably like myself, have demonstrated non-Christlike behavior. It is tough to maintain any resemblance to Jesus’ love and grace amidst the high-stress and continuing demands of health care and academics. As I reflected on these challenges, I knew the beginning point was forgiveness. Not just, the churchy version of forgiveness, but the forgiveness described and lived out by our Savior.

I encourage you to read the article in the Journal of Christian Nursing, reflecting on your own workplace and situations. Included in the article is a link Dr. Luskin, the Director of the Stanford Forgiveness Project found at Learning to Forgive

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Our workplace, like our home, is a training field for the testing of our faith and learning to live Christ-like.

Consider it all joy, my brethren, when you encounter various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces endurance. And let endurance have its perfect result, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing (James 1:2-4; NASB).

 

 

 

NCFI Cares: P is for Presence

Imagine the following scenario:

While a nurse is driving to work at a busy hospital, he prays, “Lord, help me to show your love and grace,” for each staff member he will encounter. He receives report on his patients and then, prior to entering each patient’s room, he quietly asks the Lord, “Guide me in being a caring presence.”

The day continues with the nurse offering quiet, timely prayers, “Thank you Lord for your wisdom and guidance.”  A patient, who is struggling with a terminal diagnosis, is crying and feeling overwhelmed. Prior to talking with the patient, the nurse prays, “Let me truly listen to this patient and to your Spirit.” Another prayer is shared, “O Lord, you provide miracles!” in response to the patient who survived a traumatic injury with a complicated surgery.

The day comes to a close and the nurse drives home, he reflects on his day and seeks insight into the unknown mysteries, “O Lord, your ways are above my ways and my soul shall praise your name.”

The above scenario is an example of how we can bring the presence of the Lord into our daily nursing practice. As we go about the demands of our work, we can pray with our mind and spirit partnering with the Lord in the work he is doing with our patients, families, and colleagues.

1 Corinthians 14:15: “What should I do? I will pray with my spirit, but I will also pray with my mind. I will sing praises with my spirit, but I will also sing praises with my mind”77ba6-ncficares_3bloglogo