NCFI Cares: BUT I…

How long will my enemy be exalted over me? (vs 2). This was David’s plea to God in Psalm 13. David felt abandoned by God and experienced immense sorrow to the “point of death” (vs 3).  He also feared that his enemies would be victorious. We are not sure whether David is worried about physical enemies or spiritual enemies. Either way, he felt vulnerable and strived to remain a faithful servant. We see a similar experience with Jesus in Gethsemane:

Jesus said to them, “My soul is deeply grieved, even to the point of death…he threw himself down with his face to the ground and prayed, “My Father, if possible, let this cup pass from me! Yet not what I will, but what you will.” (Matthew 26:37-40)

Both men felt alone and abandoned by God and knew their enemies were lurking and waiting for an opportune time to pounce (1 Peter 5:8). We know this is just the beginning of Jesus’ suffering, but we are not sure where Psalm 13 ties into David’s life. And that is okay. For, both men demonstrated for us a perfect response—not to depend on how “faithful” we are feeling, or what will be the end result, or even what the enemy is doing.

Instead we can respond with a BUT I (vs 6). The word BUT is an emphatic response in writing and for our spiritual life. We can interrupt our internal dialogue and change how we respond. For example:

  • To a spiritual drought—“will trust in God’s faithfulness.”
  • To human feelings of loneliness and abandonment…“I will rejoicBUT Ie in salvation.”
  • To the enemy’s prodding… “I will sing praises to Jehovah!” (vs 5-6)

Interrupt your desert faith walk with a BUT I…

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NCFI Cares: A Personal Drought

Personal Drought

In the last devotion, we discussed sprinkling our drought ridden communities with the love of Christ. Even though we naturally think of non-Christians needing a sprinkle, Christians can experience times of drought as well. These are seasons in our faith-walk when we may lack the zeal or passion for ministry. We may feel or sense a depletion of the Holy Spirit’s strength in our life. Maybe we are plagued with doubts or fear; feel alone or abandoned by the Lord; or just apathetic about our ministry or relationship with Jesus.

“How long, O Lord? Will You forget me forever? How long will You hide Your face from me? How long shall I have anguish in my soul, Having sorrow in my heart all the day?”

These are the words of David from Psalm 13. We don’t know what was happening in David’s life when he poured out the barrenness of his soul. But, we are encouraged knowing that many mighty men and women of God experience personal droughts.

Does your faith feel dry and cracked? Is your relationship with the Lord empty and barren? If you are currently experiencing a personal drought, much like a dry season of the soul—then take comfort in knowing you are not alone. Many Christians have and are currently needing their own sprinkle.

Grace & Peace

p.s. In the next devotion we will look at how David responded to his spiritual drought.

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When Hope Is Lost: Part 2

In the Part 1, we loaded our backpack of hope with a various nursing interventions. In Part 2, we focus on bringing hope to our patients through spiritual care for both Christians and non-Christians. As followers of Christ, we may hesitate to provide spiritual care interventions for those of other faiths. This is where our spiritual care experts can be consulted. Whether it is a hospital chaplain or coordinator, these wonderful men and women are partners in encouraging our patients. They also have the time to sit and chat with a patient, a challenge for the busy aJCN Covercute care nurse.

Also, included with the article is Supplemental Digital Content–listing specific resources for nurses looking for additional books, websites, etc.

I would enjoy discovering other interventions in your backpack of hope–feel free to share other ways you facilitate hope for your patient.

 

Click on the JCN cover to see all the articles in Christian Nursing 101 Collection!

When Hope Is Lost: Part 1

Hopelessness and despair can be common experiences for our patients with cancer, terminal illness, or tragic trauma. As nurses we are well positioned to assess patients for signs and symptoms of hopelessness and intervene to curtail the devastation of despair.  The article in the current issue of JCN begins a list of interventions supported by nursing and scripture that we can use with our patients. The interventions also includes “patient/nurse” commentaries offering support and guidance as we tackle this tough issue. I would love to hear your stories! Whether it is from nurses who inspiring hope with your patients OR from patients/people who have received support, word, and/or encouragement from nurses or healthcare providers.   JCN cover Be sure to check out the article in the Journal of Christian Nursing (July/September 2014)

And keep your eye out for the Part 2 in October!